Day 5/60: I don’t have all the answers

(If you can’t see the facebook video, you can view on YouTube here)

It’s important to experiment with different things, even if you have a process that already works, to see if there’s a better way. That’s why I’m embedding this video from Facebook rather than YouTube.

I’ll talk about experimentation vs optimisation at some point in the next few days!

I know you're probably busy right now...

Would you like to receive my top 7 articles to read in your own time? These are some of the most important principles I think every PhD student (or academic) should know. Enter your name and email and I'll send you one per day for the next 7 days.

Live Webinar

How to write your PhD thesis: The secrets of academic writing

21st November 2018 2018

Click here for details

Privacy policy

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time. Your email will never be shared with anyone. Powered by ConvertKit

3 thoughts on “Day 5/60: I don’t have all the answers

  1. Well, Phd is like a roller coaster ride.Some days you feel very happy when u do all your work according to your plans made..sometimes you feel irritated n depressed but yeah it needs patience n smart work. So just enjoy the journey. In the end..the word Dr. is all what wld compensate it with joy n happiness for all that you had struggled till now. So enjoy the journey..Good luck.

  2. I had to come to accept the fact that I couldn’t do everything for my PhD, and I had to let some things go. I’ve just finished writing up my final results chapter. The results from my lab work found so many interesting things that could have (and some did) take me down totally different pathways to what the original research plan was. But there came a point where I had to accept that I couldn’t do everything with the samples I wanted to, and I had to let things go in order to complete.

    That was especially compounded by the fact that the samples I worked on for my PhD were collected by other people – the original studies weren’t designed to answer my research questions specifically, and I had to make the most of what I had, and justify why other things couldn’t be done.

    Also, I took a very different approach to my supervisors than I see a lot of other PhD students taking. Even though we had agreed to a rough plan of analyses I would perform on my samples, the finer details were still up to me. So I came up with a project management plan, what analyses I would do specifically (with references to back up why I picked certain targets), how long things would take, and importantly, what they would cost. Having the references to back up what I wanted to explore, really made it difficult for them to say no to some of my research. But it was a good base for them to say, yes, and what about also performing ABC?

    • That’s great, going to your supervisors with a well-thought-out plan with justification. It makes it so much easier for supervisors when students work this way!

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.